The Little Cities Archive

Shawnee, Ohio

ABOUT US

Interior View of The Archive

The Little Cities Archive has been established to serve as the repository for all forms of information about the history of the Little Cities of Black Diamonds area which includes southern Perry, northern Athens, and eastern Hocking Counties of Ohio.  The archives has a physical and online presence.  The physical archive is located on West Main Street in Shawnee, Ohio .  We encourage you to visit.  The Archive is open Monday thru Thursday from 10:00am to 2:00pm.

You are currently visiting the online version of the Little Cities Archive.  To browse the Archive, click on the Home button located at the top left of this window.  You can scroll down the page to see the  photos, newspaper articles, documents or artifacts in the order that they are posted.  At the bottom of the screen are arrows to take you back to older posts.

You can also view material arranged into five different categories:  Artifacts,Books & Media, Photos, Documents and Biographies.  Browse any of these categories by clicking it in the Links Menu on the left sidebar.  Use the SEARCH box in the upper left sidebar to look for specific people, places or things.  You may also browse by THEME on the right side bar. Enjoy your visit !


29 Responses to “ABOUT US”

  1. Adam B. Kelley said

    i recently read a posting by Arthur Van Horn on this site and i was inquiring about how to get in touch with him? he wrote an article about Shep Tinker. is there anything you can help me with? thank you for your time and consideration.

  2. I visited this summer with a group of teachers. I was so impressed by the town and the townspeople. I teach 4th grade and we learn about the richness of Ohio history and the significance of coal in Ohio. I read the story “In Coal Country” to my kids as I shared some coal with them. Incidently, this story was written by a woman who teaches 6th grade in a town close to Akron, Ohio.

    My grandfather grew up in Byesville Ohio, which we also visited this summer. He never worked in the coal mines, but he ended up working for Firestone in Akron. My father also worked for Firestone Rubber in Akron.

    Will be sharing this site with my kids today. I am also wearing the Little Cities shirt that was for sale in one of the town shops.

    Thanks,
    I hope to visit again!!
    Linda Parsell
    4th grade teacher
    Voris CLC

  3. JRW said

    Please note that the New Straitsville Industrial and Photographic History is now available as single page posts in the Documents category

  4. Samuel Davis said

    Hello, My family and grandfather are buried there in Shawnee up the yellow brick road cemetary on the tall hill past Tecumseh Drive.I think everyone in Ohio owes it to themselves to see Shawnee,it should be on everyones Bucket List.Great job on the new websight. We the “True Believers” know that”Ohio’s Phoenix” will rise from the ashes and flood waters again. Thank you for all of your tireless work in behalf of Shawnee residents past and present. Merry Christmas and may God bless you all, Shawnee Sam

  5. In the brick paved alley behind my house (built in 1888) are some Wassall brick pavers. It was really great to see a picture of the plant where they were produced.

    Keep up the good work !

  6. Ed German said

    I was born and raised in Zanesville, and remember hearing my father talk about the burning mines in New Straitsville. But we never went to see them. I attended OU and traveled frequently between Zanesville and Athens, but still never drove through either Shawnee or New Straitsville. If I ever get up that way again (and I’d really like to) seeing these two Cities of the Black Diamonds will be a top priority. I really miss Ohio, especially the SE part, but not so much in the winter!

  7. Mary Bonn said

    Here in Louisville, KY, I have become absolutely enthralled reading about this area of OH. I was editing a book about history of a religious order who taught for four years in St Augustine New Straitsville 1893-97, and began looking around for when school was built, when closed. Didn’t find much about that, but found a treasure of other info re the area and am making plans to rent a cabin in Logan to visit the entire area this summer. The same order of nuns taught in Shawnee from 1888-, and also Corning 1891 – I was taught by them in the 50s & 60s and often heard these names, but never really paid that much attention until I began looking around for info on New Straitsville. Fascinating, and you have remarkable archives and recorded data. I totally agree with the person who wrote that Shawnee and surrounding area should be on everyone’s bucket list. M. Bonn

    • Mary Bonn said

      Here in Kentucky, I have become enthralled reading about this area. While editing a history of religious order who taught in New Straitsville 1893-97, I started looking for when school was built, when closed. Didn’t find that, but found a treasure of other info, more than enough to lure me to the area. Same nuns taught in Shawnee and Corning late 19th- early 20th century. Agree that Shawnee & New Straitsville should be on everyone’s bucket list.

  8. Cinda said

    my other GR GR Grandfather is Thomas Gibson… mine boss of Shawnee Valley in 1895. Anything on him? Would love any info!

    • Cheryl Blosser said

      We have several Gibson’s on the Miner’s Registry but I did not see Thomas Gibson. Please go to the Little Cities of Black Diamonds website and fill out a Miners Registry form for Thomas Gibson. The registry is almost to 6000 names and we will reprint the hard copy booklet soon. Mail the form to Little Cities of Black Diamonds Council, PO Box 128, Shawnee Ohio 43782

  9. Jerald Gross said

    Any idea what happen to Coal Company Registers and logs?

  10. Ed Margraf said

    In reference to Mary Bonn, I was taught, in Corning, by the nuns of the Sisters of Charity of Nazereth, I believe that the mother house was in Nazerath KY. They were teaching grades 1-8 and stopped in the mid 60′s………

  11. David Hanley said

    My cousin Phillip Blower is the great grand son of Phillip Blower. My moms dad Sylvester Doughty, and my great grandpa Frank Smith, Great Grandpa Miles Patrick Hanley and Grandpa Hanley all worked the mines around Glouster. Sylvester Doughty was injured in the mines twice. After the second time, he never went back in. But, he on to do a lot of colorful jobs around the area. Like laying the brick roads around Glouster and Nelsonville. He sold moonshine to the sheriff as anti freeze. He boxed, played music anything to make money.

    • Cheryl Blosser said

      Mr. Hanley,
      there is a Miner’s Registry on line at www. littlecitiesofblackdiamonds.org I looked at the names and we do not have entries for your family names. Please send us a form so we can get these names into the registry. We will be printing a paper version again this fall as we are now close to 6000 names.

  12. Bob Johnson said

    Hi,
    Do you have reguar hours at the Archives or is necessary to make an appointment. I am very flexible on time so it would be easy for me to just visit during regular hours if you have them.
    Thanks,
    Bob Johnson

  13. very nice site.

  14. I am sorry to hear about all of the demolition that took place this past November in Shawnee. The buildings were falling down and the demolitions were necessary, I know this only too well. (Still it hurts from one run down old man, watching the old ones go.) I do not know what the plans are but I hope that new “Welsh Upper Porches” are in the Master Plans. The truely unique feature of the coal mining towns like Shawnee,the porches were built when “any thing West of Pennsylvania was the Wild West.” So, I wax sentimental, Good-by old Boarding House, that probably housed my Dad, Grandpa, and Great grandpa, at one time or another, Good -by Williams Agency, and the others who were slowly crumbling or had already fallen. I picture hundreds of “coal dusted Miners” there on Main street in Shawnee, tipping their Hard Hats, with un-lit Carbide Lamps, looking for their lost places.Indians wandering into town, to trade their wooden buckets of Salt for a bucket full of the “Black Fire Rock”. Shawnee is still alive, and always will be.

  15. Deanna Wyatt said

    I recently bought a house in Congo that my husband and I are restoring. In the house I found an old lithograph “Greetings from Congo, Ohio” postcard that I would love to share with your site. Please contact me if you would like me to send you a copy for your great website. Thanks!

  16. Steven Moore said

    I love the website and you can tell you have put a lot of heart into it. I was wondering how I could submit photos I have of my ancestors to this website. I am also in need of some help finding information on my great great grandfather James Thomas Moore (born 1865 in Cheshire, Ohio and died 1921 Coal Twp Perry County, Ohio . I was wondering what your suggestion would be to finding out what mine he worked it. I have him living in New Straitsville, Ohio working as a coal miner in 1910 census. Where would I begin to search.

    • JRW said

      Thanks Steven. Just email me the pictures at jwinnenb@columbus.rr.com. The Perry County Archive in New Lexington has newspapers that go back to 1917 and do include 1921. Many old financial records there might help you get more info. I am there from 9am to noon on Mondays but it would be good to email me if you are planning a visit

  17. allan said

    I was just looking for photos of SanToy. Little did I expect to find such an EXCELLENT collection of old mining town photos!

  18. Great job on this site. Here is a resource for those looking for more information on brick pavers.

    http://bricksofohioblog.wordpress.com

  19. a couple of years ago I purchased an album of old postcards, not realizing until later that they were an ongoing correspondence between a man and woman in the corning/’ringgold ohio area. this occurred in early 1900′s. found out online that they married, had five daughters. my husband and I just returned from following the trail up there from our home in east Tennessee and I have become so intrigued by the history of this area. i’m just now trying to track down a copy of adam clayton powell’s book on rendville called “against the tide” and feel l have so much to learn and discover.

  20. Harold F Gilbert said

    Does anyone have any pictures of the old Flamingo Club/Club 93/Club 75? What was the building used for originally?

    • Rob Dishon said

      It was always a club as far as I have been told. It once had a large dance floor before the kitchen was expanded and took up the space.

  21. Mentioned Little Cities Archive in http://nelsonrainsgenealogy.blogspot.com/2014/01/collection-highlight-2-hanna-essex-coal.html. If you are interested in a copy of the Hanna-Essex Coal Company receipt, I have a higher quality scan I can send.

  22. MaryAnn Kelso said

    Ii recently found a picture of my grandfather’s 1897 graduation class from Corning High school. I would love to share but I cannot see a feature that lets me post a picture. Do you have any suggestions as to how I might post this picture?

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